Studio and Theatre Rental Rates

NGO/Individual

Venue Hourly Half Day
(4 hours)
Full Day
(8 hours)
Weekly
(6 days)
Sarafina R130 R390 R780 R3120
James Mthoba R120 R360 R720 R2880
Allan Joseph R100 R300 R600 R3600
Ramolao Makhene Theatre R1500 R3000 R9000

Commercial

Venue Hourly Half Day
(4 hours)
Full Day
(8 hours)
Weekly
(6 days)
Sarafina R260 R780 R1560 R6240
James Mthoba R240 R720 R1440 R5760
Allan Joseph R200 R600 R1200 R7200
Ramolao Makhene Theatre R3375 R6750 R20250

Ramolao Daniel “Bra Rams” Makhene

Born 01 Febuary 1947 – Died 13 July 2010

The Market Theatre Laboratory’s theatre is named the Ramolao Makhene Theatre in celebration of a lifetime’s contribution to the development of the arts by Ramolao “Uncle” Makhene.

Ramolao was a drama teacher at the Market Theatre Laboratory. An actor himself, he was passionate about helping keen young actors and emerging artists. He had a tremendous love for children and young people. He appeared in an “XXX mint” advert on TV in the eighties, and children would follow him singing “Extra Strong”, to which he would reply in rhythm “U gogo wakho”.

Wherever he was, people were always smiling, and he always said that the best newspaper accolade that he ever got from a writer was “Ramolao has got a smile as wide as a slice of watermelon”. His Lab students addressed him as “Captain my captain” or “Uncle”, or “Malome”.

Ramola started his acting career in the early seventies. While working in the library at Wits University he joined theatre company Workshop71, where he took part in workshopping several productions, including Zipp, Survival, Small Boy, uNosilimela, and the revival of Crossroads. Ramolao joined Junction Avenue Theatre Company in 1976, and contributed significally to the creation of plays such as Randlords and Rotgut, Security, Marabi, Sophiatown, and Love, Crime and Johannesburg. He was one of the first members of the film collective Free Film Makers, though he was more comfortable in front of the camera than behind it. With this company he made a charming and rather awkward film called When I Eat Chocolate I Remember You.

As a professional actor, he performed around the world in shows including Nongogo, Master Harold and The Boys, Death And The Maiden, The Story I’m About To Tell, and A Street Car Named Desire. He was the first president of PAWE (Performing Artists Workers Equality) and served for two consecutive years. It was in this leadership that he attempted to improve the quality of life and working conditions of the South African acting fraternity.

Ramolao was a successful actor and leader, but it is in the countless young people that he taught, encouraged and mentored that his legacy truly lies.